Broken Knuckle

It is probably safe to say that our hands are one of the most used parts of our body, which makes them one of the most susceptible to injury. In fact, hand injuries are some of the most common injuries in athletes. If you participate in sports, such as basketball, baseball, football, or boxing, you could be susceptible to breaking a knuckle.

If you think you may have broken one of your knuckles, FastMed can help. Our walk-in clinics are staffed with medical professionals who are trained to provide adults and children with treatment for non-life-threatening illnesses and injuries.Broken Knuckle

When Your Knuckle Sandwich Fights Back

A boxer’s fracture is one of the most common types of knuckle injuries. It occurs when a closed fist comes into contact with a hard object.

Our hands contain 5 metacarpal bones that are responsible for connecting our fingers to our wrists. These metacarpal bones are made up of a base, shaft, neck, and head. When a boxer’s fracture occurs, it is typically the neck portion of the metacarpal that breaks. If you have a broken knuckle, you may experience some of these common symptoms:

  • Pain or tenderness around the area
  • A snapping or popping sensation in the bone
  • Swelling or discoloration around the injury site
  • Misshapen joint or finger

In order to properly diagnose a broken knuckle or boxer’s fracture, your physician will likely conduct a physical exam and order x-rays. If your x-rays show that you have a fracture, it is likely that he or she will then immobilize your hand to allow for proper healing and alleviate pain.

If you think you may have a broken knuckle, come to FastMed. Injuries don’t always occur during doctor’s office hours. That’s why FastMed is open 365 days of the year. We even have digital x-ray machines, so we can provide you with a diagnosis as quickly as possible. When injuries happen, FastMed’s walk-in clinics are right in your neighborhood throughout Arizona and North Carolina.

The content presented on this page is not intended to diagnose health problems or take the place of professional medical care.