Herpes STDs

Herpes STDs: What to Know

Herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Statistics show this type of STD is very common, where one in five US adults has genital herpes and 90% who already have it don’t know they are infected. Find out how to identify herpes and what to do if you think you might be infected.

How is Herpes Spread?

Herpes STDsYou can get herpes (hsv-2) by having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has the disease.

Herpes sores are filled with fluid that carry the virus. Coming into contact with those fluids can cause infection. It’s possible to contract herpes even if someone is not showing any symptoms at all because the virus can be released through your skin and spread the infection.

How Can I Tell if I Have Herpes?

It’s not always easy to tell just by looking if you have herpes. An obvious way to tell is if you have clusters of small fluid-filled blisters that break, forming painful sores that crust and heal over several days. Affected areas can include:

  • Penis

  • Scrotum

  • Vagina

  • Vulva

  • Urethra

  • Anus

  • Thighs

  • Buttocks

How Can I Prevent Herpes?

There is no cure for genital herpes, but you can avoid contracting the virus in a few ways. The first way is total abstinence from any sexual activity. The second way is to have a sexual relationship where both partners are herpes-free.

If your partner has had an outbreak of herpes before, using condoms or a dental dam while having sexual relations when symptom-free can help reduce transmission. Partners can also take medication for herpes, however, it’s always advisable to err on the side of caution because herpes symptoms do not have to be present to pass along the disease.

If you think you may have herpes, your local FastMed can conduct tests to see if the virus is present. FastMed has on-site labs and caring medical professionals to get quick results to have you feeling better in no time.

The content presented on this page is not intended to diagnose health problems or take the place of professional medical care.