O Positive Blood Type

Blood is thicker than water … Blood-brothers … Blood, sweat, and tears…

There are many way to express the importance of blood. In the most literal sense, it is essential the substance that circulates oxygen throughout the body and ensures everything properly functions. Blood is comprised of the same type of basic elements, but not all blood cells are alike. For example, you could have an O positive blood type, or AB negative. Determining what type of blood you have can be useful in a variety of situations, such as before donating or receiving blood.

If you need a blood test to determine the type of your blood, stop by a FastMed clinic near you. We have on-site labs that provide fast results and save you time and money.

My Blood Type Is O Positive. What Does That Mean?

O Positive Blood TypeThere are four major blood groups determined by the presence or absence of two antigens, either A or B, on the surface of red blood cells. These groups are further broken down into positive and negative based on the presence of absence of an antigen called the Rh factor.

The four groups are:

  • Group A
  • Group B
  • Group AB
  • Group O (O positive is the most common blood type)

Blood type tests are usually done before situations that may require you to donate or receive blood, or to check someone’s identity. Here are some common situations in which blood tests may be required:

  • Before a person gets a blood transfusion
  • Before a person donates blood
  • Before a person donates an organ for transplantation
  • To show whether two people could be blood relatives
  • To check the identity of a person suspected of committing a crime

To find out if you have an O positive blood type, or what other bloody type you are, visit FastMed. Our walk-in clinics are 365 days a year with extended hours during the week, as well as open hours on weekends and holidays. We make it easy for you to come in for a blood test at a time that is convenient for you.

The content presented on this page is not intended to diagnose health problems or take the place of professional medical care.