Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy

The tonsils are two masses of tissue that are located in the back of the throat. The adenoids are located on the roof of the mouth and aid the immune system, just like the tonsils. Both a tonsillectomy and an adenoidectomy are very common procedures that remove the tonsils and adenoids. These operations are mostly performed on children, but it is possible for an adult to require surgery as well. A tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are outpatient procedures and typically result in a full recovery. After surgery, it’s important to follow the recommended guidelines to ensure a patient’s smooth recovery.

A tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy may be performed due to blockage of the airways. Inflamed tonsils may also cause frequent sore throats and repeated tonsillitis. Additionally, swelling and inflammation of the adenoids can cause the Eustachian tubes to become blocked, which can lead to potential hearing loss.  

What To Do After a Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy

Tonsillectomy and AdenoidectomyPost-Op

Recovery time will depend on the patient’s age but can range anywhere from one to two weeks. The following guidelines may aid in the recovery process:

  • Drinking. Fluids are incredibly important during the recovery process. It’s recommended that fluids be consumed immediately following surgery.  
  • Eating. Most medical professionals will recommend consuming soft foods after surgery, but there aren’t any restrictions on the type of food that can be ingested. Returning to a regular diet may take a little time, but the sooner you begin chewing solid foods, the quicker the recovery time.
  • Activity. Regular levels of activity may be increased slowly and back to normal once pain medication is not necessary.
  • Pain. It is normal to experience mild to severe levels of pain coupled with a low-grade fever. Pain in the neck and ears may also occur. If you experience severe levels of pain for an extended period of time, contact your medical professional for additional attention.

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The content presented on this page is not intended to diagnose health problems or take the place of professional medical care.