Who Should Not Get Vaccinated

Just like any medication, vaccinations can cause side effects that should be taken into consideration before adults and children get them. For most people, vaccines are extremely safe and a necessary part of preventing diseases. However, some people (specifically those with compromised immune systems or certain allergies) should consult a medical professional before getting vaccinated.

Note: While there has been negative press about certain vaccines causing autism in children, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that there is no link between autism and vaccines

Common Vaccines and Who Should Avoid Them

Although vaccines are a safe and effective method of disease prevention, certain people should speak with a medical professional before getting vaccinated. Below is a list of common vaccines for both children and adults, as well as an explanation of who is at risk for developing vaccine-related complications.nurse administering a shot

Influenza Vaccine

The influenza vaccine (also known as the flu shot) is developed twice a year to help protect against the flu. The following individuals should consult a medical professional before getting the influenza vaccination:

  • Anyone with severe, life-threatening allergies
  • Anyone who has ever had Guilliain-Barré Syndrome
  • Anyone who is feeling sick

Tetanus Vaccine

The Td (or adult tetanus) vaccine is typically administered to adults who did not receive the tetanus vaccine as a child. Over a 7 to 12 month period, one would receive a three-vaccine combination. The first would be the Tdap vaccine which protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. The next two doses protect against tetanus and diphtheria, respectively.

Those who should not receive the Td vaccine includ:

  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a previous tetanus or diphtheria vaccine dose
  • Anyone who has had severe pain or swelling after a tetanus or diphtheria vaccine
  • Anyone who suffers from seizures or other nervous system problems

Consult a medical professional about any allergies before scheduling a Td vaccine.

Hepatitis A and B Vaccines

Hepatitis A and B are both diseases that cause inflammation of the liver. Typically, you will have the option to get two separate vaccines or a combination vaccine that protects against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B. The following people are at a higher risk of developing vaccine side effects:

  • Anyone who has had a severe allergic reaction to any vaccine components
  • Anyone who has had a severe allergic reaction to a previous dose of the hepatitis A or B vaccine
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill
  • Women who are pregnant
  • Anyone who is severely allergic to yeast

Other common vaccines include:

For a complete list of vaccines and who should not be vaccinated, see the CDC’s guide to vaccines and immunizations.

If you have concerns about recently received or upcoming vaccinations, or simply need to get vaccinated, visit your local FastMed Urgent Care. We offer walk-in flu shots and certain vaccines 7 days a week, making it easy for you and your family to get the care you need at a time that works best for you.

Don’t forget to contact your local FastMed Urgent Care to confirm vaccine availability before you arrive.

fastmed clinic location



CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/concerns/autism.html

CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/should-not-vacc.htm

Web MD: http://www.webmd.com/vaccines/tetanus-vaccine

The content presented on this page is not intended to diagnose health problems or take the place of professional medical care.